Health QuestionsCategory: TreatmentsAnticonvulsants / Mood Stabilizer we’ll cover
Jerod asked 3 years ago

From Basic Information About Anticonvulsants / Old School Mood Stabilizers.
 
Please see that page for more detailed information.
 
Medications we’ll be covering here, not in order of popularity:
 
The valproates:  
 
Depakote (divalproex sodium)
Depakene (valproic acid)  
and the rarely used (but much more popular overseas) Depacon (valproate sodium or valproate sodium depending on the literature you read)  
Look closely, note that valproic acid is not the generic for Depakote.
 
 
Next up are the Enzyme Inducing Anti-Epileptic Drugs, or EIAEDs.
 
Dilantin (phenytoin)  
Luminal (phenobarbital)
Tegretol / Carbatrol / Equetro (carbamazepine)  
Trileptal (oxcarbazepine)
 
 
Only the last two work in similar ways in your brain and chemically related.  See the pages for more detail, but you can pretty much switch between Tegretol and Trileptal without too much trouble.  Dilantin is also classed as a Hydantoin, along with Cerebyx (something you’d only get in a hospital).
 
That leaves all the other anticonvulsants:
 
Felbatol (felbamate)  
Keppra (levetiracetam)
Lamictal (lamotrigine)
Mysoline (primodone) (withdrawn from most markets, good luck finding it)  
Topamax (topiramate)
Zonegran (zonisamide)
Neurontin (gabapentin)
Lyrica (pregablin)  
Gabitril (tiagabine)
 
 
People are constantly asking me what the equivalents are for different anticonvulsants.  Except for Tegretol / Carbatrol / Equetro (carbamazepine) and Trileptal (oxcarbazepine), or all of the valproates (Depakote (divalproex sodium), Depakene (valproic acid) and  Depacon (valproate sodium)), it literally is an apples and oranges comparison.  
 

Jerod asked 3 years ago

From Basic Information About Anticonvulsants / Old School Mood Stabilizers.
 
Please see that page for more detailed information.
 
Medications we’ll be covering here, not in order of popularity:
 
The valproates:  
 
Depakote (divalproex sodium)
Depakene (valproic acid)  
and the rarely used (but much more popular overseas) Depacon (valproate sodium or valproate sodium depending on the literature you read)  
Look closely, note that valproic acid is not the generic for Depakote.
 
 
Next up are the Enzyme Inducing Anti-Epileptic Drugs, or EIAEDs.
 
Dilantin (phenytoin)  
Luminal (phenobarbital)
Tegretol / Carbatrol / Equetro (carbamazepine)  
Trileptal (oxcarbazepine)
 
 
Only the last two work in similar ways in your brain and chemically related.  See the pages for more detail, but you can pretty much switch between Tegretol and Trileptal without too much trouble.  Dilantin is also classed as a Hydantoin, along with Cerebyx (something you’d only get in a hospital).
 
That leaves all the other anticonvulsants:
 
Felbatol (felbamate)  
Keppra (levetiracetam)
Lamictal (lamotrigine)
Mysoline (primodone) (withdrawn from most markets, good luck finding it)  
Topamax (topiramate)
Zonegran (zonisamide)
Neurontin (gabapentin)
Lyrica (pregablin)  
Gabitril (tiagabine)
 
 
People are constantly asking me what the equivalents are for different anticonvulsants.  Except for Tegretol / Carbatrol / Equetro (carbamazepine) and Trileptal (oxcarbazepine), or all of the valproates (Depakote (divalproex sodium), Depakene (valproic acid) and  Depacon (valproate sodium)), it literally is an apples and oranges comparison.