Health QuestionsCategory: TreatmentsHints on Staying Med Compliant?
HarryPotterGeek asked 3 years ago

6 months into treatment, I’m tempted to quit my meds.  I know it’s the drugs that aremaking me feel better, but it’s so damn tempting.
 
Any hints/clues onhow to stay med compliant?

13 Answers
Anonymous answered 3 years ago

Re: Hints on Staying Med Compliant?
Here’s a hint, if you don’t take your meds, the feeling good part of your life will go away and when you decide to start taking your meds again they might not work like they do now.
And Snape and Hermione will be married and make babies. (ok i made the last part up but the first two lines are true for lots of the rest of us)
max (more of a josey wales/’69 camaro fan)

martasi answered 3 years ago

Re: Hints on Staying Med Compliant?
What reasons are you giving yourself for wanting to quit meds? Here are/were my favorites:
 
When I’ve quit meds in the past, it’s usually been due to unbearable side effects (like uncontrollable diarrhea or major tooth decay). Sometimes I would gradually “quit” taking meds by cutting the dose each day without admitting to myself what I was doing, and pretty soon I was off of that med! It was a gesture of anger as well, but I didn’t realize it at the time.
 
Sometimes I’d get very confused and have trouble keeping track of my meds and which I had and hadn’t taken. This is partly illness-related.
 
I also would quit meds because they weren’t working and the side effects weren’t worth it.  
 
Another reason was the stigma attached to taking daily meds. I really had trouble with this one. Daily meds = mentally ill = social pariah, who would want me, must keep Big Secret, etc.
 
As you can see most of the above are negotiable. I’ve learned that meds and dosages can be adjusted, I can keep a med log, and I can keep in closer touch with my PDoc rather than just making med decisions on my own w/o trying any options. For me it was always “all or nothing.” I’ve also overcome the stigma of being MI rather than wasting energy fighting it.
 
 

Anonymous answered 3 years ago

Re: Hints on Staying Med Compliant?
Quote from derailed on 26. Jul 2006 at 22:16:

And Snape and Hermione will be married and make babies.

 
Whoah whoah derailed. With the lot of hair those two have going on, I’d bloody well hope not!
 
T.

HarryPotterGeek answered 3 years ago

Re: Hints on Staying Med Compliant?
Like I told my therapist yesterday, I just feel so much better, so much more like myself.  I have no side effects.  (except for insomnia, easily remedied with some benzos.)  And sometimes, hanging around here, I feel like my stuff “isn’t that bad” and I don’t qualify for being MI.
 
So far I have reminded myself of three things:
1. Abrupt withdrawl would be dangerous and stupid.
2. I’m smart enough to “know” that my meds are what make me feel this well.
3. Depression SUCKED ASS, and I don’t want to go back there.
 
I committed to a year when I started taking my drugs, to lessen the chance of a relapse.  Now I’m thinking it will probably be a year and a half, quitting next summer at the earliest.  I’m pre med, and my school work takes a LOT out of me, so I can’t really afford to attempt withdrawl during the school year.  
 
It’s… just… hard.  Ya know?  I feel like I don’t need them and they aren’t doing anything, when in reality they are doing their job perfectly, and I don’t even have to deal with side effects.  I guess I should consider myself lucky, I have hit the jackpot.  An effective cocktail with no downside.  
 
It’s just hard to remind myself, daily, that I still need them.  
 
(And Hermione and Snape?  Come on, that’s not even creative.  At least make it twisted, like Hermione, Fred and George or something…)

gretl answered 3 years ago

Re: Hints on Staying Med Compliant?
Hermione, Fred, and George is strangely … intriguing.   Smiley Smiley
 
Quote:

And sometimes, hanging around here, I feel like my stuff “isn’t that bad” and I don’t qualify for being MI.

Instead, try to take away from our stories that if you don’t handle this wisely, your MI *will* be that bad.  If nothing else, we can be a bad example!  And you can be the smart one.
 
I think it’s generally recommended these days that a person suffering the first depressive episode stay on meds for a year and then try weaning.  If you’ve had recurrent episodes or been unresponsive to one or more meds, it’s less cut and dried.  Ditto if there’s family history.